Top 6 Reasons Muslim Girls Need to Visit Oman!

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One of the main reasons I haven’t been active on Muslimgurl.com is because 4 months ago I came to live in Oman. 

A quick recap of Oman; it’s a predominantly muslim country, one of the most peaceful and safest places in the world, and most importantly, a muslim country where even religious sects pray side by side in harmony. I’m talking like Shia and Sunni’s praying side by side without being at each others throats, like if that’s not an achievement, I don’t know what is.

And it sounds nice doesn’t it? Well, it gets even better 🙂

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Picture I stole from the blog Andy in Oman. It’s a photo of the food court in Muscat City Centre I believe.

1. EVERYTHIG IS HALAL

This one might be obvious, as a muslim country it’s readily assumed that everything there will be halal. However, in Oman it’s even better because they include all the major diners and restaurants you might’ve had back home, except now you can eat whatever you want in them at any location. Nandos, Subway, Pizza Hut, Burger King, McDonald’s, Chilies, Tim Horton’s… they’re all here and they’re all halal! No need to search online for halal
restaurants before I leave the house anymore :p

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Sunset at Yeti when we visited during Eid!

2. BEACH, GYM, POOL…BEACH!!

You know those stares that you get when you’re at the beach fully dressed while everyone else isn’t? You don’t get that here. You can swim dressed in anything you like at the beach. And there’s plenty of women’s only gyms and pools that you can go to without having to feel like you’re doing something horrifically wrong simply because of the way you’re dressed. And actually, you can wear whatever you want, put on an abaya, then take off the abaya in the locker room and voila. Zero awkwardness. Zero uncomfortableness. 

 

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A picture of Oman Avenues Mall from the outside that I stole from the internet!

3. SHOPPING 

The target consumer is you! Toothpaste ads emphasize things like “minimal breath” during ramadan and those delicious food commercials apply to you as well! Furthermore like with restaurants, all the major brands you’d want like Zara, Mango, H&M, Victoria’s Secret and a hundred others are all here. How sweet is that. 

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See that hat the guy is wearing? That’s a distinctly Omani hat to wear for men. Also, image credit goes to the British Council.

4. DIVERSITY

Many Middle Eastern countries now a days, lack diversity due to the safety issues prevalent in the area, however, in Oman, you will find a large population of Indian, Philippino, British, Bangladeshi, basically many ethnicities so you don’t feel ethnically bound to only one group, one culture and one way of thinking. 

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Sultan Qaboos Mosque (the 3rd largest mosque in the world) here in Muscat, Oman. Picture taken a few days ago, if you come early in the morning, you can head to the office and volunteer to help out for the day!

5. FITTING IN 

When I first stepped foot in Oman, there was a strange feeling of relief: not because we’d landed safely, but because I no longer had to prove that I’m a normal human being who doesn’t carry out terroristic acts for my religion to every single person I passed by.

I know it might sound a bit extreme, but the brutal reality is that unfortunately, some people really do believe that I, as a hijabi woman, would try to hurt them as part of my “religious beliefs.”

And the worst part is, there is no way to distinguish between someone who dislikes me for my personality and those who dislike me for my religion. The relationship is so gray that I’m constantly torn between, should I try harder to make a good impression to represent my reigion better, or do I change something about myself because it’s setting people off. Is it me they hate, or is it what I represent?


It’s a very confusing battleground, and the worst part is I can’t imagine the middle schoolers and high schoolers having to deal with this in addition to their life overload at this stage in their lives.

And that’s where the relief comes now that I’m in Oman: nothing is gray. The majority are muslim and the expats are here willingly, furthermore there is no sectarianism here. Meaning unlike other muslim countries, they don’t care about the political sunni-shia issues, the mosques here are beautiully packed with worshippers praying with their hands at their sides or across their chest, each to their own.

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6. ENGLISH, ENGLISH, ENGLISH!

Though it is an arabic country, the majority of transactions and interactions are done in English. Signs, prints, ads, everything is in big, bold beautiful English! To me this is a major plus since even day to day interactions such as at the cashier and restaurants are carried out in English, making my life so much easier since I no longer have to explain why yes, I’m arab, and yes I can speak arabic, but no, I have no idea how to communicate with you when I’m trying to order food or trying to open a bank account. 


And though Oman is a quiet and traditional country, it is organized and well-maintained, obviously there are downsides, but overall, it’s a not too shabby place to be in, and I will most definitely miss it when I leave next week. If you have the chance, give this charming quiet little country a visit.

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3 DON’TS OF HIJAB FASHION!

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بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

Ok so I have a confession, I’ve fallen into many “HIJAB DON’TS” over the many years I’ve worn hijab. Honestly, sometimes looking at my old photos makes me cry a little on the inside because I can’t believe the horrendous outfits I’ve worn, in public! But just because I fell into horrible hijab mishaps, you shouldn’t have to! I’m going to share three HIJAB FASHION DON’TS for those who want to save themselves before it’s too late 😛  Continue reading

SPOTLIGHT SATURDAYS: My Instagram Story

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بسم الله الرحمن الرحيم

First thing I do when I wake up: check my phone. Second thing I do: Pray.

It was a Friday morning when I reached over to pull my phone loose from it’s charging wire. I’ll admit, I wasn’t as gentle as I should’ve been and my wire could’ve easily broken. But hey, I was still groggy and half asleep.

On this particular day I chose to check my Instagram feed first. I was scrolling down past photos of my friends, when my eyes landed on a quote that one of my muslim sisters had posted:

“What if you woke up tomorrow with only the things you had thanked God for the night before?”

Instantly, I thought back to yesterday and ran through my memories to see if I had said AlhamdulAllah for anything. As my eyes wandered my room, a sinking feeling hit me and I realized that I had literally not thanked God for a single thing in my life. Not just yesterday, but in a long time, because I couldn’t remember a single recent event where I had said it.

With shame, I slowly looked around my room and took in just how blessed I was—still am.

I had all the necessities, with many luxuries mixed in. My guitar and piano and Playstation 4 and laptop and Nike shoes and skateboard all stood as living proof that I had more than what I needed. And I mean sure I would thank my mom when she buys these things for me, but I’ve never thought of extending my gratitude beyond that.

Now, everyday after prayer, I take a quick moment to thank Allah (SWT) for at least three things, and I encourage you all to do the same.

They can be anything. Whether they hold a big or small place in your heart. Literally thank Him for the first things that pops into your head. Usually, I end up thanking Him for more than three things, because one thing leads to another, and I’m left sitting there just overwhelmed with how much I have to be grateful for.

Today I thanked God for: my health, my family, and my books.

What have you thanked Him for today?


Welcome to the first Spotlight Saturdays post! This post was written by a sister who wants to remain anonymous but nonetheless wanted to get across this beautiful message of gratitude through her story. Hope you enjoyed this as much as I enjoyed reading and sharing it with you! If you have a story you would like to share for next Saturday, or any Saturday (regardless of length) send it to me HERE. Don’t be shy!! :))

Film Fridays: What Does London Think of Muslims??

Who else watches Adam Saleh? I love his videos, and I picked out this video from his Vlog channel because I thought it’s pretty cool.

Why I WONT Pray for Paris because Im Muslim

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بِسْمِ اللهِ الرَّحْمٰنِ الرَّحِيْمِ

Within minutes of the Paris tragedy, news and social media erupted into a frenzy regarding everything that dealt with the attacks, and the hashtag #PrayForParis was trending everywhere.

As much as I would love to take part in this, I cant, I wont.

I will not pray for Paris because Im Muslim.

I can already imagine any anti-Islamist and Islamaphobe reading this pointing a finger at me and rejoicing, saying I knew it, I knew it. I knew you Muslims were disgusting and despicable. Continue reading

Why Eating Halal Doesn’t Suck

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بِسْمِ اللهِ الرَّحْمٰنِ الرَّحِيْمِ

I eat Halal, meaning that often times, I can not eat meat depending on where I’am eating, and places like McDonald’s and Burger King are considered out of network for me, since the only thing I can eat there is their salads and fish sandwiches.

Actually, most places, are out of network for me. As a result I often have friends, both Non-Muslims and Muslims who don’t eat halal, end up feeling bad for me. And often times my Muslim friends who don’t eat Halal will try to tell me there’s no point in eating Halal and that there isn’t a difference, and that if I just say “bismiLah” (In the Name of God) before eating, then it’s all good. But is it? Continue reading

Film Fridays: 2 Faiths, 1 Prayer Jews & Muslims

The media loves the idea of Jews and Muslims hating each other. They love portraying it and focusing their lense on any person or act of hate towards the other to further support this idea and image, making it seem like thats the norm. However, aside from the lenses of the big screen, some students did a video of Jews and Muslims praying together, showing that thats not always the case, and that our different faiths can become a common ground for us to unite over. Beautiful video.👌🏼